Sunday, 18 April 2010

The Slow Drive

I have been overwhelmed by the comments made and the support offered by fellow bloggers this past few weeks. All those who have commented, on the content of the blog, and those who have offered support in my time of pain, I give you thanks. I painted on Friday working on the painting I showed you a few days ago, “In the Beginning,” adding more texture and making the colours more alive. I am not sure I have improved it and I am kind of stuck with where to go next but the joy of being back in front of the easel. Maybe not wise, in the light of yesterday’s pain, but it did make me feel good.


This reminds me of an event that happened to me some time ago. Before moving to this part of the world I used to live in the west of Scotland. There I was a member of a fitness complex and golf club. During the summer holidays I spent long hours there. Not far from the complex was a shopping area with a little inn. Now again we visited on the way home.

One day I went in there were three members of staff and two customers, myself and another. The staff were busy, cleaning glasses, wiping tables and dusting bottles. I waited and waited until at last I felt forced to ask if anybody was serving. I was told to have patience they would be there soon. I waited another three minutes and left.

Two weeks or so later I was visiting one of the shops and as I passed the inn I saw the manageress leave in her car. She ended up just behind my car following down the hill. I slowed my car to a slow rate and drove onwards. She was getting more and more impatient, flashing her lights at me and the odd peep in her horn. When we reached the bottom at a junction I stopped my car and walked back to hers. “Have you got a problem?” I asked. “I was wondering what was keeping you making you so slow,” said the lady. “Ah, just what I was wondering last time I was in your inn.”

Did I achieve anything? Not really, I felt good at the time but just for a short moment. My impatience has often led me to do things I have later regretted. Did I change her attitude? I do not know but I doubt it. So here I am all those years later asking the same questions. Has my impatience ruined this painting? Was I wise to let impulse drive me to the easel too soon? Is it good enough to say it felt good at the time?


This blog is linked to my other blog where the artwork used is discussed:-Early Morning Fishing

8 comments:

  1. Ok, Ralph. That behavior from you takes me by surprise! LOLOL I would have expected the high road. That said, I'd have been aggravated by that service at the inn myself!

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  2. Reminds of the time I was working in a law office and a man came in with a tissue over a bleeding nose and missing a tooth.
    He had pulled up at the stop light half a block away for a red light; the man in the vehicle behind him got out of his car and wne to his window and punched him in the face. An irate driver who said "that's for cutting me off". End of story the irate driver paid heavily in court.
    Can't comment on what you did because as an aunt once told me "You had better be a doctor because lacking patience, patients is all you'll ever have".
    My impatience has not been with others however but with rushing to the next stage in my day and my life. I've slowed now, age has been a blessing in the patience department.

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  3. I like your fresh sea-painting Ralph! (Oil-pastells?); and the big waterfall from left mountainrange... Patience is the answer for Impatience, I think and do it most times easier. But your reaction did no harm to anyone, so it's no fault I mean.

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  4. My favorite!!! Lovely, peaceful, interesting, good color, good composition... my favorite!

    Loretta
    =^..^=

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  5. Oh you rascal! I am 100% sure the lady in question's attitude did not change.

    Ralph - great artist and a great storyteller. And prolific ... well done.

    Patience? ... Hmmm.

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  6. A day spent painting is always a good day. Regardless of the outcome of the painting, there is value in the act of considering a subject, putting brush to canvas, and letting loose with a fresh approach.

    Impatience? There's something I can identify with!

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  7. Thanks to all for all the great comments.

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  8. Ohh Ralph, LOVE that ; )

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